November 2020 Competitive Round Call

 

Call for Applications

The Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) is calling for Expressions of Interest (EOI) that address research, development & extension (RD&E) priorities nominated by the FRDC.

The nominated RD&E priorities for investment are outlined below. EOIs that address multiple priorities are encouraged.

Applicants may also submit an EOI that does not address a nominated priority; however, it should be noted that preference may be given to applications that address nominated priorities. FRDC strongly recommends that all applicants consult with the relevant stakeholder groups and expected end users to ensure that research concepts has the support of beneficiaries. Support can be demonstrated through formal letters of support, in-kind contributions and project cash contributions. Applications that are not addressing a nominated priority are due 20th January 2021.

Minimum EOI Requirements

All EOIs MUST be completed via FishNet. Refer to the FRDC website for more information on the FRDC’s process for Applying for Funding.

Once you have completed your EOI you must finalise it on FishNet so that FRDC receives notification that the application is submitted. Failure to do so may mean that your application is not submitted and therefore not considered for funding.

If you have any questions or issues with FishNet, please contact the FRDC by phone (02) 6122 2100 or email frdc.programs@frdc.com.au.

PLEASE NOTE: The November 2020 call includes to two application deadlines. Short term projects 11.59 pm (23.59) 6 December 2020; other projects deadline is 11.59 pm (23.59) 20 January 2021. 

Each EOI must clearly outline how it will meet the relevant identified Need(s). Provide a succinct description of the proposed Method to achieve the stated Objectives, and deliver the expected Outputs and Outcomes. This should include a quantification of the impact of the research if the outputs were adopted such as a change in fisheries management, an improvement in the species population, increased profitability or efficiency of the commercial sector or improvements in recreational fishing experiences. Applicants also need to define project Extension activities that will be used to disseminate expected project findings. A realistic Budget that reflects the activity to be undertaken is to be provided along with Justification for the budget request. Where appropriate, applicants should demonstrate collaboration with other relevant research providers and end users and consider, and detail, past and current research to avoid duplication and build on previous outputs.

After the closing date, the FRDC will undertake an evaluation process which may involve obtaining feedback from relevant stakeholder groups for assessment, and possibly external technical review. Following this evaluation, you will be provided advice via email on whether their application has been supported or not supported in the round.

The FRDC is changing the way in which we will be calling for applications in the future. We encourage you to keep an eye on FRDC communications to keep updated on how applying for funding will occur in the future.

 

Priority Areas

Download a PDF version of the November 2020 Competitive Round Call for Expressions of Interest (PDF, 256 KB)

 

Title

Quantifying inter-sectoral values within and among the Indigenous, commercial and recreational sectors

Need

Building community trust has been identified as a key priority for Australian fishing and aquaculture in an effort to improve recognition of the contributions these sectors make, but also to address issues that may impact their ‘social license to operate’.

However, trust among sectors (e.g. recreational and commercial fishers) or between regulators and resource users is equally important, as trust will underpin effective decision-making processes; e.g. associated with co-management and resource access. A critical element to the development of trust is establishing two-way understanding of the social, economic and ecological values, objectives and aspirations both within and among the Indigenous, commercial and recreational sectors.

This project would seek to develop a preliminary understanding of values of the Indigenous, commercial and recreational sectors, identifying contrasting and complementary values among these groups.

Moreover, the project would recommend mechanisms for efficient and broadly applicable data collection and collation.

Deliverable

The project will collect Data that captures the values of each sector (and within the sectors i.e. are there clear sub-sectors); highlighting areas of similar view. The data will be used to aid and underpin consultations between sectors on key issues such as associated with the development of harvest strategies that address the triple bottom line. Similarly, to aid in establishing opportunities for cross-sectoral collaboration to address shared issues; i.e. improved animal welfare outcomes.

Timing

This is a short timescale project.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 6 DECEMBER 2020

Report should be completed by June 2021

End user

Primary – Fisheries sectors and Managers

Jurisdictions

Nationally focused – though potentially tested through jurisdictional / regional case studies.

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

 

This project would consider the approach and outcomes from FRDC project 2017-242 ‘Our Pledge’. It will also utilise the market research work on values undertaken by the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment – see https://www.agriculture.gov.au/fisheries/communication

 

 

Title

Abundance estimation toolbox

Need

Several methods have been developed to estimate the abundance of fish species to assist in undertaking stock assessments. These include the application of genetics, tagging, acoustics, trawl surveys and assessments of eggs as well as proxies of abundance such as catch. Each of these methods have their benefits and limitations based on the fish species being assessed such as their life history and behaviour as well as the habitat that the species lives in such as water depth. Moreover, the logistical costs and expertise required varies among these estimation approaches. Hence, the application of each method of estimating abundance is potentially species/scenario specific.

To aid researchers and managers identify the best suited abundance estimate approach, there is a need to develop a decision tree and methods ‘toolbox’ that describes the techniques, their relative strengths and weaknesses.

Deliverable

Fit for purpose abundance estimates (in a timely and cost-effective manner) to inform stock assessment processes that improve the management of fish stocks.

The development of a ‘toolbox’ of abundance estimation techniques would be used to inform:

  1. the techniques that are available to estimate abundance
  2. the suitability of the technique to different scenarios such as life history parameters of species, data availability (or absence), assumed low population size
  3. the requirements of the technique such as methods used, pre-requisite expertise, data and cost
  4. under what circumstances can the technique be used and the underlying assumptions.

This project would also identify potential new and novel approaches and/or technologies that might complement or replace current methodologies.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 20 JANUARY 2021

End User

Primary - Fisheries Managers and Scientists

Secondary – Industry

Jurisdictions

Nationally focused – drawing on international examples/expertise

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

The activity should consider and where applicable link to other projects associated with stock assessment methods such as 2018-148 “A Stock Assessment Toolbox for Australian Fisheries”, 2017-102 “Reducing the Number of Undefined Species in Future Status of Australian Fish Stocks Reports: Phase Two - training in the assessment of data-poor stocks” and 2015-215 “Low cost management regimes for sustainable, small low-value fisheries based on coastal inshore species”

 

 

Title

The circular economy in fishing and aquaculture

Need

There is increasing interest in moving from the linear model of “take-make-waste” to one where products and materials are kept in use, processes are in place to use waste and remove pollution and natural systems are regenerated. This circular model has the potential to build economic, natural, and social capital and can provide enhanced flows of goods and services.

As part of the FRDC R&D Plan 2020-2025, Outcome 1 “Growth for enduring prosperity”, there is a need to unpack and clearly explain what and how the circular economy relates to fishing and aquaculture.

Deliverable

A report that looks across fishing and aquaculture, that quantifies (scale and scope for improvement) and outlines the key areas and opportunities to improve, partner or pivot activities for better outcomes.

This would take the form of a synthesis of information developed will include:

  1. overview of the concept of circular economy
  2. how circular economy relates to fishing and aquaculture (by sectors), including downstream activities such as post-harvest processing and packaging
  3. what other sectors and industries are doing and how they relate/could be adopted by fishing and aquaculture
  4. opportunities that are available and identifies areas for exploration in the short, medium and longer term to progress a circular economy for fisheries and aquaculture.

Timing

This is a short timescale project.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 6 DECEMBER 2020

Report should be completed by June 2021

End user

Primary - Fisheries Managers

Secondary – Industry

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

Links to the Food Innovation Australia development of the 2030 Waste Strategy

 

 

Title

An audit of plastic use in the fishing and aquaculture sectors

Need

A commitment was made to make the 2019 national industry conference, Seafood Directions, a plastic-free event. This provided an important opportunity to raise awareness about plastic pollution in marine environments.

Plastics are used by all sectors for various purposes. However, currently there is no baseline data for fishing and aquaculture around the various uses and volumes of plastics.

Deliverable

A report that outlines:

  • plastic usage and volumes across to the Australian seafood industry, inclusive of the production/harvest and post-harvest sectors.
  • approaches for the industry to adopt cost effective sustainable solutions to plastics usage across the production/harvest and post-harvest areas.
  • potential future options to address plastic waste.
  • Examples of other primary production sectors currently investigating alternatives to plastics.

This audit should build on previous work undertaken including 2004-410.

Timing

This is a short timescale project.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 6 DECEMBER 2020

Report should be completed by June 2021

End user

Primary – Fishing and Aquaculture Community

Secondary – General Community

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

2004-410 Reducing plastics in the Australian seafood industry

 

 

Title

An audit of energy use and carbon emissions in the Australian fishing and aquaculture sectors

Need

Energy use and carbon emissions are an increasing topic of discussion especially regarding the reduction of emissions and moves towards renewable energy. Australia’s fishing and aquaculture sectors can involve energy intensive activities such as pumping and heating of water, towing of nets and running refrigeration units.

Building on previous research there is a need to update this information and undertake an audit of the current energy use and carbon emissions of the fishing and aquaculture sectors and scope alternative energy sources to reduce emissions and what would be required for the sectors to do so.

Deliverable

A report that looks across fishing and aquaculture providing an audit of energy use and carbon emissions accompanies with possible solutions and what would be required to implement them.

Timing

This is a short timescale project.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 6 DECEMBER 2020

Report should be completed by June 2021

End user

Primary – Fishing and Aquaculture Community

Secondary – General Community

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

2005-239 Fishing energy efficiency review for the FRDC; 2006-229 Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery Industry Development Subprogram: development and implementation of an energy audit process for Australian fishing vessels; 2011-229 Tactical Research Fund - Empowering Industry: energy audit of prawn trawler with auxiliary sail power; 2007-200 SESSF Industry Development Subprogram: alternative fuels for fishing vessels; 2011-246 Opportunities and constraints on Australian wild fishing and aquaculture under a carbon economy;

 

 

Title

Resolving stock uncertainty for priority species

Need

The Status of Australian Fish Stocks Reports (SAFS) brings together available biological, catch and effort information to determine the status of Australia’s key wild catch fish stocks. These reports focus on the status of biological1 fish stocks where possible. Where the stock delineation is not known, reporting is often undertaken at the level of either the jurisdiction or the management unit.

To improve the reporting of biological stocks in SAFS, the FRDC is requesting applications to help resolve stock structure in one or more of the following species:

  • Mangrove Jack
  • Silver Trevally
  • Giant Spider Crab - Leptomithrax gaimardii
  • Ocean Jackets
  • Giant Crab

Following best practice, projects could seek to take a holistic approach to defining species’ biological stock structure to improve certainty.

1 Genetically or functionally discrete population that is largely distinct from other populations of the same species and can be regarded as a separate homogeneous group for management or assessment purposes.

Deliverable

Improved understanding of the structures for the outlined species. Reporting of stock status of priority species improved to resolve and use biological stock structures.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 20 JANUARY 2021

End user

Primary - Fisheries Managers

Jurisdictions

Projects will need to focus at the scale of the whole species’ distribution

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

This activity should consider available information already available for relevant species such as 1997-125 Description of the biology and an assessment of the fishery for silver trevally off NSW, 2002-004 Determination of biological parameters for managing the fisheries for mulloway and silver trevally in Western Australia

 

 

Title

Mitigating Threatened Endangered and Protected Species (TEPS) interactions with Australian Tuna longline fisheries

Need

While progress on sustainability and quality in Australian tuna fisheries has been very good, challenges remain, including interactions with non-targeted wildlife including TEP species such as seabirds, turtles, toothed whales and sharks.

 

There is a need to scope and trial alternative technologies to mitigate interactions with seabirds, turtles, toothed whales and sharks.

Deliverable

Trials of alternative mitigation technologies with the view to industry adoption.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 20 JANUARY 2021

End user

Primary – Fishing industry specifically Tuna longliners

Jurisdictions

All that have longlining activities

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 2

Other

This activity should build on previous trials of mitigating technologies for these TEPS.

 

 

Title

A synthesis of the efficacy of fisheries enhancement methods for integration into the fisheries management toolbox

Need

  • To build a knowledge base relating to fisheries enhancement/intervention methods and their long-term viability and establish the most effective fisheries enhancement methods
  • To identify cost efficient fisheries enhancement methods and identify which are the most suitable to be used and adopted as reliable fisheries management tools
  • The project should undertake a literature review of monitored fisheries enhancement methods and undertake a cost benefit analysis of them
  • Integration model of fisheries enhancement methods into fisheries management decision making
  • Alternative tools to use to increase the sustainability of a fisheries stock

Deliverable

  • Efficient (and alternate) fisheries management tools that
    • deliver increased ability to improve the sustainability of a stock; and
    • increased cost efficiency in providing fisheries enhancement initiatives
  • Fisheries managers trained on tools

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 20 JANUARY 2021

End user

Primary - Fisheries Managers

Jurisdictions

All states and territories

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 1, Outcome 2

Other

Consideration should be given to other jurisdictions/countries where stock enhancement activities have been undertaken and fisheries management

 

 


Title

Investigating re-opening closed shared access fisheries

Need

  • To build a knowledge base relating to re-opening shared access fisheries that have been closed for sustainability reasons
  • To build on engagement projects with shared access fishing sectors and promote sector input into decision making and co-management
  • To guide engagement and decision making in case studies in South Australia, including Murray Cod and Snapper
  • Literature review of historical fisheries re-opening events
  • Integration of disparate data sets into a decision making matrix with transparent triggers to re-open closed shared access fisheries
  • Provision of a rebuilding/recovery strategy for inclusion in a harvest strategy
  • Provision of a toolkit to enable fisheries managers to follow a process of reopening shared access fisheries

Deliverable

  • A transparent decision-making matrix for re-opening fisheries based on case study of fisheries
  • Toolkit to provide for consultation and decision-making regarding re-opening shared access fisheries

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 11.59 pm (23.59), 20 JANUARY 2021

End user

Primary - Fisheries Managers

Jurisdictions

All states and territories

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 4

Other

Consideration should be given to other jurisdictions/countries where previously closed fisheries have re-opened