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March 2019 Stakeholder Update

 

Contents

 

Download a PDF version of the Stakeholder Briefing March 2019

 

Funding round update

The November open call round closed on 15 February. There were 45 applications received in the open call which are now being considered by the RACs, IPAs and Subprograms for comments and funding support. The first of these applications are likely to go before the FRDC Board in their April/June meetings.

If there are priority areas of research from stakeholder groups then there will be another open call announced in April/May. If required, the call for applications will be advertised through the usual FRDC channels and posted on the FRDC website (http://frdc.com.au/Research/Call-for-applications).

As part of the application evaluation process by the RACs, IPAs and Subprograms, these committees (and FRDC Management) may request that proponents submit revised Full Applications to providing greater detail and/or addressing specific comments as defined in a decision notification letter provided by FRDC. It is highly recommended that all proponents provide itemised response letters to the comments provided with the finalised application to aid the evaluating committees.

All finalised Full Applications for funding to the FRDC must come through the FRDCs funding application portal FishNet (www.fishnet.gov.au).

FRDC independent review of RAC and IPAs

The recent independent performance review of the FRDC made a number of recommendations to the FRDC (see section below). Two of these recommendations have initiated the review of the RACs and IPAs:

  • Recommendation 3: During the development of the next RD&E plan, FRDC should review the way it organises and manages its RD&E program (its investment and evaluation framework) with the aim of simplifying it so that it is easily understood by the average stakeholder.
  • Recommendation 7: FRDC should strengthen its approach to extension, possibly by creating a specific position to oversee or coordinate extension across the organisation.

It has been over a decade that the FRDC has been entering into agreements with different stakeholder groups to help in the prioritisation and funding of research for fishing and aquaculture. To ensure continued relevance of these structures in helping inform the best use of FRDC funds the FRDC is seeking a comprehensive and independent review of the current partnership model with a view to identifying:

  • How the various models are managed by the FRDC and how that management might be improved
  • The degree to which they meet stakeholder needs
  • How well they are meeting the FRDC’s extension/adoption/impact goals
  • Areas for improvement generally
  • How well they are contributing to the FRDC realising its planned outcome

The review will provide recommendations as to how the FRDC might better partner with stakeholders in the future. This might include providing alternate partnership model(s) as informed by better practices used by other Research Development Corporations. The review will also provide recommendations on the capacity and capability needs of the FRDC in developing and maintaining effective partnerships into the future. It will also review the various approaches to extension taken by both the FRDC and its partners, and make recommendations as to where and how extension might be improved.

Portfolio approach to approving funding of FRDC research

The new FRDC board has shown a keen interest to ensure they are providing input at a more strategic level to the way in which FRDC goes about its business. In order to do this they are looking at ways they can conduct business in a more efficient way. One of the things they are looking at doing is to provide higher level approvals for FRDC research. This would be based on both the FRDC and the various stakeholder group RD&E plans and would require regular updates on progress. Additionally there would be an agreed risk framework which would dictate whether the board would assess a project individually for approval or if the approval would be provided at a higher level.

In effect this would mean that the board would no longer approve most projects on an application by application basis. This should improve the timing that it takes for FRDC to process projects from application through to contracting.

At this stage the process of applying is not going to change although there may be some slight variations to it in the future. The FRDC will continue to update stakeholders with more details on these changes as decisions are made.

2018 Status of Australian Stock Status Reports

The Assistant Minister Richard Colbeck will launch the fourth edition of the Status of Australian Fish Stocks Reports on Wednesday 6 March at the ABARES Outlook Conference in Canberra http://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/outlook.

In total 120 species made up of 406 stocks were assessed in this Report, including 37 new species.

The results are that the majority of Australia’s fish stocks are well managed and healthy. The Reports cover the majority of the Australian caught fish that Australians will eat and of the stocks assessed almost 80% were sustainable (excluding Undefined and Negligible).

Stock Status

Number of stocks

Total stocks

 

Catch

 

% of catch species

 

Biological stock

Management unit

Jurisdiction

Sustainable

99

99

57

255

128,893

90.5

Depleting

6

12

4

22

4,199

3.1

Recovering

8

8

2

18

6,547

4.6

Depleted

11

13

5

29

1,115

0.8

Undefined

12

22

20

54

1,573

1

Negligible

3

3

22

28

721

0

Total

139

157

110

406

142,328

100

 

Robust Science: The strength of the Reports is their foundation in science. The Reports provide all the facts and information on the status of fish stocks based on the best available science.

Over 100 of Australia’s fisheries scientists contributed to the writing of these Reports. A further thirty-five fisheries scientists externally peer reviewed the Reports for accuracy.

Reducing the number of undefined stocks in SAFS: There has been a steady decrease in the number stocks of unknown status. Forty-nine stocks were Undefined in 2016. Of these, 30 stocks remained Undefined in 2018.

 

Tracking change: From the outset there has been an aspiration to Report on stock status trends across editions, to illustrate progress against typical performance measures for a stock status. As part of delivering SAFS 2018, work has been completed to map and show trends of species going from being depleted back to sustainable and vice versa.

For example, Southern Bluefin Tuna has moved from depleted in SAFS 2018 to recovering in SAFS 2018. Recent assessments have shown clear progress towards the rebuilding target set by the Commission for the Conservation of Southern Bluefin Tuna (CCSBT) to guide the recovery of the biological stock to 20 per cent of unfished biomass by 2035. We are not there yet, but from all accounts, we are well on our way to achieving that target before 2035. Other examples include:

Improving

Species – Stock assessed

2014

2016

2018

Southern Bluefin Tuna

Depleted

Depleted

Recovering

Big Eye Tuna – Pacific Ocean

Depleted

Depleted

Sustainable

Blue Swimmer Crab – Cockburn Sound

Depleted

Depleted

Recovering

Blue Swimmer Crab – Shark Bay

Depleted

Recovering

Recovering

Blue Swimmer Crab – Gulf St Vincent

Recovering

Sustainable

Sustainable

Blacklip Abalone  Victorian Western Zone Fishery

Depleted

Sustainable

Sustainable

Depleting

Species – Stock assessed

2014

2016

2018

Ballot's Saucer Scallop - East Coast Trawl Fishery

Sustainable

Depleted

Depleted

Commercial Scallop – Victoria

Undefined

Undefined

Depleted

Commercial Scallop – Tasmania

Undefined

Undefined

Depleted

Snapper – Shark Bay oceanic, WA

Sustainable

Recovering

Depleted

Snapper – Northern Spencer Gulf Fishery, SA

Depleting

Depleting

Depleted

Blacklip Abalone Victorian Central Zone Fishery

Depleted

Depleting

Depleting

Blacklip Abalone New South Wales

Recovering

Sustainable

Depleting

Blacklip Abalone Tasmanian Eastern Zone Fishery

Recovering

Sustainable

Depleting

 

While the current picture is good, we cannot rest on our laurels and past performance. Fish stocks are constantly changing and require constant monitoring. The managers, fishers and even consumers should keep an eye on what is going on.

The results provide a clear road map, highlighting areas that need further work, for management, industry and researchers.

The reports are available to the general public, policy makers, managers, industry, consumers, retailers, and to the international community via the dedicated website (www.fish.gov.au) and phone apps for both Android and Apple – just search for SAFS – Sustainable Fish Stocks.

Shark Report Card

Alongside the launch of the Status of Australian Fish Stocks reports is the release of the Report Card of Australia’s Sharks (2013-009 “Shark Futures: A report card for Australia's sharks and rays”). This report undertook an assessment of 194 species of sharks (and rays with shark like bodies) by 23 of Australia’s leading shark and ray scientists.

These experts brought together the best available science on these species and applied the IUCN RED List Categories and Criteria and translated this to the categories and criteria of the Status of Key Australian Fish Stocks Reports to indicate the sustainability of these species in Australian fisheries. The 194 species were split into 199 stocks. The results of the assessment are as follows:

Status of Australian Fish Stocks category

Number of stocks

Sustainable

124

Recovering

9

Depleting

6

Depleted

18

Undefined

42

Total

199

All 194 species reports will be available on the FRDC website and the final report can be found at /project/2013-009

FRDC’s 2020-25 RD&E Plan development

Building a vibrant and innovative fishing and aquaculture industry requires careful and deliberate planning. Through the years the FRDC have produced a series of 5-year Research, Development & Extension (RD&E) Plans. Each has taken a contemporary look at the business landscape, and laid down, against that landscape, a series of desired outcomes for fishing and aquaculture over that five-year period, and areas of strategic focus. Each plan also seeks to articulate the optimal framework for investment in RD&E to achieve the vision for fishing and aquaculture in Australia.

The process of delivering the FRDC’s 2020-25 RD&E Plan has started and will continue throughout 2019. The plan will be shaped by the priorities of the Australian Government, the Australian Fisheries Management Forum, and the needs and aspirations of the sectors and industries that make up Australia’s rich fishing and aquaculture community. To assist, the FRDC will be conducting an extensive consultative process over coming months. The process will be designed to provoke thought and feedback on possible future states of fishing and aquaculture in Australia; activities to respond to key internal and external driving forces; and review systems, investment frameworks and processes to improve efficiency in delivery of outputs through investment in RD&E.

The FRDC 2020-25 RD&E Plan will also be informed by:

  1. a contemporary snapshot of fishing and aquaculture today, updating earlier work conducted in 2014 (FRDC Project 2014/503.20);
  2. a horizon-scanning process looking over a ten-year time horizon (2030) that considers geopolitical, social, economic, environmental and/or technical changes likely to occur over 2020-2030, drivers of those changes, and implications for fisheries and aquaculture production, trade, pricing, fishing participation, expenditure, and the environment;
  3. The Independent review of FRDC’s performance, and proposed independent review of RACs and IPAs (see above)
  4. relevant strategic plans and strategies that are extant for the nominated five-year period

Ernst and Young Vision for Rural Innovation in Australia

Ernst and Young is leading a project to create a shared vision for the future of the agricultural innovation system and enable opportunities for a vibrant agricultural sector. The vision will be designed through engagement with stakeholders. The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, in conjunction with Ernst & Young (EY), will undertake a comprehensive consultation process with stakeholders across the agricultural innovation system, including research providers, rural research and development corporations, industry representatives, governments, investors, start-ups and accelerators, producers, grower and farm systems groups, processors and retailers.

For Further Information see: http://www.agriculture.gov.au/ag-farm-food/innovation/vision-for-agricultural-innovation

Independent Performance Review of FRDC Completed

The FRDC is required under its 2015-19 Funding Agreement with the Commonwealth Government, to engage an independent organisation to undertake a comprehensive review of its performance by 2 December 2018. The FRDC board agreed to the terms of reference with the Department in Sep 2017 and Foresthill Consulting (led by Scott Williams) was selected to undertake the review. As part of the review Foresthill Consulting undertook a number of face-to-face interviews, as well as seeking broader stakeholder feedback. The report was completed and provided to the Department for consideration.

In total, 10 recommendations have been made and the FRDC has agreed to fully implement all 10 recommendations. These are currently being actioned. The Review and the FRDC board response to the review can be found at /About-us/Corporate-documents/Funding-agreement.

Fish 2.0 – Regional hub of seafood entrepreneurs and investors

A second, larger Australia–Asia-Pacific regional event is scheduled for Brisbane in April 2 and 3 2019. It will include opportunities for Australian ventures that have competed online in FISH 2.0 to pitch to a broad group of investors from Australia, the Pacific Islands and South-East Asia.

Sign up for the online competition or to receive news about the Brisbane event at the FISH 2.0 website (www.fish20.org/ventures/2018tracks/australia).

All ventures that qualify through the online competition will be invited to join the FISH 2.0 global online connection platform to connect with business partners and investors. Top-scoring finalists will also be invited to pitch at the FISH 2.0 Global Innovation Forum in Silicon Valley in late 2019.

There is no cost to participate in the online competition.

FRDC Seafood Industry Safety and Welfare National Strategy – project SeSAFE update

A key component of the FRDC’s Seafood Industry Safety & Welfare National Strategy is project “SeSAFE – Delivering Industry Safety through Electronic Learning” (2017-194). SeSAFE was established to develop electronic learning modules to facilitate the uptake of knowledge required for an improved culture of safety awareness, including general workplace safety requirements under workplace health and safety legislation.

For more information, refer to the SeSAFE dedicated website - www.sesafe.com.au

Sponsor the WFC2020

Australia will host the World Fisheries Congress 2020 (WFC2020) in Adelaide from 11 to 15 October 2020. The International Program Committee is calling for expressions of interest to lead sessions, symposia, and education and training workshops.

Held every four years, the 8th World Fisheries Congress 2020 (WFC2020) will be the largest gathering of the research, industry and management sectors to discuss the latest advances in fisheries worldwide.

The Committee are keen to hear from any organisation who are keen to participate or showcase their organisation to 1500+ delegates from around the world and provide an opportunity to be part of and build the largest fisheries event and tradeshow in 2020.

Download the Sponsorship and Exhibition prospectus or contact the Sponsorship and Exhibition Manager at conference@aomevents.com and ask about the opportunities at WFC2020.

Renewal of the membership of the FRDC’s Research Advisory Committees

The eight jurisdictional-based Research Advisory Committees will begin the process of seeking expressions of interest for the renewal or new appointment of all Committee members including Chairs, in August 2019. The process will involve an open call for applications that will be advertised through the FRDC’s standard communication channels.

All members of the Fisheries and Aquaculture community are invited to apply, with membership based on an individual’s expertise in order to establish committees comprised of well-informed experts from across a range of sectors and field, including:

  • Commercial wild catch
  • Commercial aquaculture
  • Recreational fishing
  • Resource management
  • Processing, Post-harvest and Marketing
  • Environmental
  • RD&E execution and management
  • Indigenous
  • People development

All stakeholders are able to access information on the roles and functions of the Research Advisory Committees in the lead up to the Open call for RAC Membership at: http://frdc.com.au/Partners/Research-Advisory-Committees.

Key events 2018-19

Date

Event

More information

5-6 March

ABARES Outlook Conference

http://www.agriculture.gov.au/abares/outlook

17-19 March

Seafood EXPO North America (Boston)

https://www.seafoodexpo.com/north-america/

2-3 April

Fish 2.0 – Brisbane

https://www.fish20.org/ventures/2018tracks/australia

7-9 May

Seafood EXPO Global (Brussels, Belgium)

https://www.seafoodexpo.com/global/

10-14 June

Seaweb Seafood Summit

https://www.seafoodsummit.org/

7-11 July

AMSA Annual Conferences "Marine Science for a Blue Economy" (Fremantle)

http://amsa19.amsa.asn.au/

30-31 July

Trans-Tasman Abalone/Paua Convention (Hobart)

http://www.abalonecouncil.com.au/national-abalone-convention/2019-hobart-tas/

8-9 August

New Zealand Seafood Conference

https://www.seafood.co.nz/conference-2019/

11-13 August

Trans-Tasman Rock Lobster Congress (Queenstown, NZ)

https://www.lobsterconference2019.co.nz/

9-11 October

Seafood Directions (Melbourne)

https://www.sd2019.com.au/

14-17 October

ASFB Annual Conference "Communicate to Illuminate & Inspire" (Canberra)

http://asfbconference.org/

Dates for seafood festivals for 2019 can be found on the FRDC FishFiles website http://www.fishfiles.com.au/Media/Seafood-Festivals 

FRDC board meeting dates and locations

Date

Location

16-17 April

Port Stephens

11-12 June

Perth

14-15 August

Canberra

FRDC RAC meeting dates

Date

Research Advisory Committee meetings

More information

6/03/2019

Queensland RAC

See the FRDC website - http://frdc.com.au/Partners/Research-Advisory-Committees

12/03/2019

South Australian RAC

13/03/2019

Western Australian RAC

21/03/2019

Commonwealth RAC

27/03/2019

Northern Territory RAC

28/03/2019

Victorian RAC

11/04/2019

Tasmanian RAC

17/04/2019

New South Wales RAC

 

Key new projects approved since last update in December 2018

NOTE: some projects may not yet have been contracted

Project Number

Title

Applicant

PI

Budget $

2017-135

NCCP: essential studies on cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) prior to release of the virus in Australian waters

CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory

Ken McColl

273,383

2017-199

A preliminary assessment of the prevalence of marine micro plastics in Australian seafood

University of Adelaide North Terrace Campus

Bronwyn M. Gillanders

145,666

2017-203

Risk from Diarrhetic Shellfish Toxins and Dinophysis to the Australian Shellfish Industry

University of Technology Sydney (UTS)

Penelope A. Ajani

241,125

2018-005

Where should I farm my oysters? Does natural Cadmium distribution restrict oyster farm site selection in the Northern Territory?

Department of Primary Industry and Resources (NT)

Matthew Osborne

123,272

2018-006

FRDC Resource: Development and ongoing maintenance of Australian Fish Names Standard 2019-2020

Alan Snow Konsulting

Alan J. Snow

174,685

2018-011

A South Australian gulfs and coastal ecosystem model to optimise multi-species fisheries management in a changing environment

South Australian Research and Development Institute

Simon D. Goldsworthy

218,932

2018-020

Cumulative impacts across fisheries in Australia's marine environment

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Hobart

Beth Fulton

391,000

2018-021

Development and evaluation of multi-species harvest strategies in the SESSF

CSIRO

Richard Little

464,973

2018-027

Integrated approach to improving stock assessment of Black jewfish

Charles Darwin University (CDU)

David A. Crook

450,000

2018-034

Effects of climate change and habitat degradation on coral trout

James Cook University (JCU)

Morgan S. Pratchett

714,675

2018-035

Fisheries biology of Western Australian Salmon: improving our understanding of population dynamics in South Australia to enable quantitative stock assessments and improved fisheries management.

South Australian Research and Development Institute

Jason Earl

246,454

2018-036

Seal-fisher-ecosystem interactions in the Lower Lakes and Coorong: understanding causes and impacts to develop longer-term solutions

South Australian Research and Development Institute

Jason Earl

335,725

2018-042

Improving Outcomes of Fisher Interactions with Sharks, Rays, and Chimaeras

Monash University Clayton Campus

Richard Reina

211,556

2018-050

Where did the snapper go? Determining factors influencing the recovery of snapper stocks on the west coast of Australia

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) WA

Gary Jackson

352,587

2018-053

Enhancing the Understanding of the Value Provided to Fisheries by Man-Made Aquatic Structures

Curtin University

Euan S. Harvey

353,753

2018-055

Developing a positive cultural attitude towards the capture and release of sharks and rays

South Australian Aquatic Sciences Institute

Paul J. Rogers

358,968

2018-056

Understanding the demography and stock structure of Victorian pipis

University of Melbourne

John R. Morrongiello

278,471

2018-070

Opportunities and impacts of range extending scalefish species: understanding population dynamics, ecosystem impacts and management needs

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) Taroona

Sean Tracey

249,587

2018-074

Assessing the spawning characteristics and reproductive biology of pearl perch (Glaucosoma scapulare) in Queensland

Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (QLD)

Matthew Campbell

402,659

2018-075

Aquaculture-Community Futures: North West Tasmania

University of Tasmania (UTAS)

Karen A. Alexander

172,996

2018-079

Ecological modeling of the impacts of water development in the Gulf of Carpentaria with particular reference to impacts on the Northern Prawn Fishery

CSIRO

Eva Plagany-Lloyd

411,817

2018-104

Next generation decision support tools to support sustainable aquaculture in Storm Bay

CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere Hobart

Rebecca Gorton

791,324

2018-109

National Abalone Diver Exchange Program

Western Abalone Divers Association (WADA)

Craig Fox

255,800

2018-119

Development of a hydrodynamic model to investigate near field and regional connectivity around Okehampton Bay

Tassal Operations Pty Ltd

Michael Herzfeld

340,178

2018-124

Science to support Australia’s Southern Ocean Fisheries 2018-2020

Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) Taroona

Philippe Ziegler

1,473,000

2018-128

Seafood Trade Advisory Group - developing, implementing and communicating the Australian seafood industry trade agenda 2019-2021

Honey and Fox Pty Ltd

Jayne M. Gallagher

461,000

2018-133

Impact of environmental variability on the Patagonian Toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) fishery

University of Tasmania (UTAS)

Stuart Corney

586,621

2018-147

Diagnostic detection of aquatic pathogens using real-time next generation sequencing

CSIRO Australian Animal Health Laboratory

David Cummins

216,000

2018-148

A Stock Assessment Toolbox for Australian Fisheries

Cathy Dichmont Consulting

Cathy M. Dichmont

179,630

2018-154

A market research-driven and co-management approach to developing an industry strategy for the SA Charter Boat Fishery

EconSearch (Divison of BDO Advisory (SA) Pty Ltd)

Julian Morison

32,840

2018-156

Assessment of Pacific oyster family lines for OsHV-1 tolerance

South Australian Research and Development Institute

Marty Deveney

67,987

2018-157

Evaluation of Cobia and Giant Groper production and health in multiple growout systems, as an alternative species to farm in WSSV affected areas of South East Queensland

Rocky Point Aquaculture Company Pty Ltd

Brad Cherrie

150,000

2018-159

Spawning biomass of Jack Mackerel (Trachurus declivis) in the East sub-area of the Small Pelagic Fishery

South Australian Research and Development Institute

Tim Ward

300,000

2018-161

National Social and Economic Survey of Recreational Fishers

University of Canberra

Anthony Moore

1,072,045

2018-162

On Board Processing and Packaging Innovation in the Australian Wild Harvest Prawn Fishery

Fight Food Waste CRC

Steven Lapidge

353,750

2018-164

Commercial production trial with high POMS tolerant triploid Pacific Oysters in approved NSW estuaries.

Australian Seafood Industries Pty Ltd (ASI)

Matthew Cunningham

70,000

2018-165

Easy Open Oyster Machine Upgrade

Dr Leonard Stephens

Len Stephens

65,000

2018-166

Australian Prawn Farms - Emerging disease investigation

Australian Prawn Farms Pty Ltd

Matt A. Landos

180,960

2018-167

Seafood Industry Engagement and input into the development of the Australia-European Union Free Trade Agreement

Jim Fitzgerald and Associates

Jim E. Fitzgerald

25,350

2018-170

Development of diagnostic and surveillance techniques to promote modern Southern Bluefin Tuna health management

RMIT University Melbourne City Campus

Nathan Bott

401,793

2018-171

Growing a Digital Future – Development of digital capability frameworks

Cotton Research and Development Corporation

Jane Trindall

75,000

2018-172

Methods to profile and connect the provenance of wild caught prawn fisheries and their values to the community

Australian Council of Prawn Fisheries Ltd (ACPF)

Rachel King

469,400