Closing date for applications 11.59pm (local time) 14 February 2022 (unless otherwise stipulated)

Call for Applications

The Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC) is calling for applications that address research, development & extension (RD&E) priorities nominated by the FRDC’s stakeholders. 

The nominated RD&E priorities for investment are outlined below. Applications that address multiple priorities are encouraged where practical. 

Applicants may also submit an application that aligns to the FRDC R&D Plan 2020-25 but does not address a nominated priority. Please note, preference may be given to applications that address nominated priorities. If you do wish to submit an application that does not address a nominated priority, it is recommended that you consult with the relevant stakeholder group(s) and expected end users to ensure that research concepts have the support of beneficiaries. Support can be demonstrated through project cash contributions, in-kind contributions, incorporation of end users into the concept and formal letters of support. 

All applications MUST be completed via FishNet.  

Refer to the FRDC website for more information on the FRDC’s process for Applying for Funding

Please finalise and submit your application on FishNet so that FRDC receives notification that the application has been submitted. Failure to do so may mean that your application is not submitted and therefore not considered for funding. 

If you have any questions or issues with FishNet, please contact the FRDC by phone (02) 6122 2100 or email frdc.programs@frdc.com.au

Applications must be finalised by 14 February 2022 (unless otherwise stipulated). Applications not submitted by this date may not be accepted unless prior approval for a later submission date is provided by the FRDC. 

Each application must clearly outline: how it will meet the relevant identified priority or a specific opportunity if not addressing an identified priority; achievableproject objectives whichrespond to the priority or need; proposed methods to achieve the objectives; project outputs and outcomes including adoption pathways to impact.  

A realistic budget that reflects the activity to be undertaken is to be provided along with justification for the budget request. Where appropriate, applicants should demonstrate collaboration with other relevant research providers and end users. Proposed projects should consider past and current research to avoid duplication and build on previous outputs. 

Once submitted, the FRDC will assess each application as well as seeking an external review by end users and/or technical experts. 

Priority Title 

Nominator(s) 

Research Advisory Committee Post-graduate student funding 

Various RACs 

Developing a Harvest Strategy for species where depletion can no longer be estimated against B0: School Shark as a case study 

Commonwealth RAC 

Assessing the socio-economic value of cultural fishing in Inland Rivers 

New South Wales RAC 

Towards healthy and sustainable freshwater fish populations – assessing genetic health of priority fish species to inform management 

New South Wales RAC 

Enhancing NSW Pipi stocks – feasibility study 

New South Wales RAC 

Integrating recreational fisher experience / satisfaction into decision making 

Northern Territory RAC 

A synthesis of research conducted into the impacts of surface water abstraction on tropical aquatic species 

Northern Territory RAC 

Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives into fishery management review processes, using the Northern Territory Barramundi Fishery as a case study 

Northern Territory RAC 

Addressing uncertainties in the assessment and management of Queensland East Coast Spanish Mackerel 

Queensland RAC 

Commercial and recreational crab fishery – bycatch reduction strategies and escape vents 

Queensland RAC 

Bioeconomic analysis of Queensland’s trawl fishery to inform fishery based maximum economic yield estimates on a regional basis 

Queensland RAC 

Developing stock assessment approaches, harvest strategies and biosecurity for seaweeds in southern Australia 

South Australian RAC 

Developing stock assessment approaches to determine status and set quota for Australian squid fisheries 

South Australian RAC 

Profile of recreational fishers in Tasmania: understanding experiences, behaviours, drivers, communication needs and change factors 

Tasmanian RAC 

Risk profile for paralytic shellfish toxins in Tasmanian Periwinkles 

Tasmanian RAC 

Minor use permit for oxytetracycline in marine and freshwater crustaceans 

Aquatic Animal Health and Biosecurity Research Coordination Program 

Minor use permit for toltrazuril in marine and freshwater finfish 

 Aquatic Animal Health and Biosecurity Research Coordination Program 

Current priorities

Title

Research Advisory Committee Post-graduate student funding

Need

Several State and Territory based Research Advisory Committees (RACs) are offering funding for post-graduate (Honours, Masters, and PhD) student projects. This initiative seeks to attract high performing post-graduate students to address a range of priority fisheries projects.

Funding is available for the following projects:

  • New South Wales RAC: Resilience to the interactive effects of climate change, floods, and discard stress in the commercially important Mud Crab and Blue Swimmer Crab

    To test for short-term effects of environmental change on the physiology of Mud Crabs and Blue Swimmer Crabs subjected to capture and discarding

     

  • South Australian RAC: Post Capture Survivability of Syngnathids to Trawl Fishing

    Assess the survivability of Syngnathids to understand their robustness to being returned to the water still alive after being caught as bycatch on prawn trawl vessels.

     

  • Tasmanian RAC: Quantifying reef fish abundance and movements to sustain key fisheries in Tasmania

    To assess localised and serial depletion (e.g. of Banded Morwong and Bluethroat Wrasse) there is a need to (1) measure abundance across gradients in fishing intensity and water depth, and (2) quantify scales of individual movements across shallow and deep-water reef habitats. In combination, this information will clarify fundamental assumptions about reef fish population dynamics.

Deliverables

The funding available for each student will be $25,000 per year, for up to 3 years, comprised of an annual $10,000 top-up stipend for living expenses and $15,000 for project operating expenses.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

Various – dependent on project 

Jurisdictions

Various – as named against each project title

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems

Enabling Strategy IV: Building capacity and capability

Other

The student will gain direct applied research and industry experience by being co-supervised by a scientist from a relevant State and Territory based agency, while researching an industry relevant project and be registered at a university to undertake their post-graduate research.

 

Title

Developing a Harvest Strategy for species where depletion can no longer be estimated against B0: School Shark as a case study

Need

The Commonwealth Fisheries Harvest Strategy Policy (CFHSP) provides scope to develop harvest strategies based on alternative assessment methods. In the case of rebuilding species, it requires stock recovery to be measured relative to B0. A number of commercial species in Commonwealth fisheries are managed under rebuilding strategies, (e.g. Blue Warehou, Eastern Gemfish, School Shark, Orange Roughy, Redfish). A new approach(es) is required to accommodate stock assessments that do not provide a measure of stock status relative to B0 while still meeting the intent of the CFHSP.

This project will investigate options to develop a harvest strategy for species where depletion can no longer be estimated against B0. School Shark will be used as a case study given that it currently rebuilding, and after two decades of attempting to assess the stock with a method that relied on catch per unit effort (CPUE) as the main index of abundance that stakeholders had little confidence in, a new assessment approach based on the close-kin mark recapture (CKMR) method has been pursued. However, while the use of the CKMR method has been accepted and applied, it does not provide a measure of depletion relative to B0 and consequently, is difficult to demonstrate rebuilding or otherwise of this stock under the current settings.

Proposed activities should be informed by the following projects:

  • 2018-021 Development and evaluation of multi-species harvest strategies in the SESSF
  • 2019-036 Implementation of dynamic reference points and harvest strategies to account for environmentally-driven changes in productivity in Australian fisheries

Deliverables

  • A harvest control rule/rules that could be applied to an assessment method such as CKMR that meets the intent/requirements of the CFHSP.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

Commonwealth government, potentially some benefits to State/Territory fisheries agencies.

Consultation with AFMA and through the relevant advisory bodies (e.g. SharkRAG, SERAG, SESSFRAG, SEMAC) is advised in developing the application.

Jurisdictions

Commonwealth – Southern and Eastern Scalefish and Shark Fishery

May have flow on benefits to State fisheries agencies

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best Practices and Production Systems

Other

This priority has been supported by AFMA's advisory committees (SharkRAG, SESSFRAG, SEMAC) and the AFMA Research Committee (ARC). The ARC noted that this is the highest unfunded priority for the SESSF, given broader implications to future uptake of the CKMR method.

 

Title

Assessing the socio-economic value of cultural fishing in Inland Rivers

Need

The cultural value of fishing in inland rivers is unknown in 'Western terms and metrics'; yet is widely acknowledged in Aboriginal communities.

Quantifying the socio-economic values of cultural fishing for inland rivers is needed to allow Aboriginal communities to participate more equitably, negotiate for water access in policy instruments (e.g. water sharing plans) and cultural water negotiations and to identify and participate in priority river rehabilitation programs. This will empower and inform Aboriginal communities to allow their voice to be heard and effectively communicated to Fisheries managers to allow cultural values to be recognised and integrated into decision making.

Deliverables

Characterise social and economic values and benefits of cultural fishing in Inland Rivers that are meaningful to Traditional Owners focussing on how these are associated with:

  • Resource access and use
  • Water availability, policy, and operations
  • River restoration activities

Knowledge gained will need to be transferred formally through technical reports, scientific manuscripts and presentations and reporting and communication products tailored to provide information to the communities.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

  • Traditional Owners
  • NSW Government agencies
  • Commonwealth Government agencies.
  • Development of the application and delivery of the project requires co-design, capacity building and participation of relevant Indigenous communities

Jurisdictions

NSW, but will be an important pilot for future national programs

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 3: A culture that is inclusive and forward thinking

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources

Outcome 5: Community trust, respect, and value

Other

This priority is aligned to the FRDC's Indigenous Reference Groups' Research Priorities

  • Primacy for Indigenous People
  • Acknowledgement of Indigenous Cultural Practices
  • Self-Determination of Indigenous Rights to use & manage cultural assets & resources
  • Enhance capacity building opportunities for Indigenous people

This project should look to integrate the tools presented in the Australian Fisheries and Aquaculture Industry 2017/18: Economic Contributions – Practitioner Guideline (FRDC project 2017-210) if undertaking measurement of economic contributions

 

Title

Towards healthy and sustainable freshwater fish populations – assessing genetic health of priority fish species to inform management

Need

  • Anthropogenic impacts such as river regulation, drought, and invasive species have resulted in changes to the abundance and distribution of many freshwater fish species.
  • The ability of a population to persist over the long term is dependent on key genetic (e.g. genetic diversity and effective population size) and demographic factors (e.g. dispersal and reproductive output). The combined effects of small population size and fragmentation can lead to a loss of genetic diversity and reduce the ability of the population to adapt to climate change.
  • There are several remediation approaches taken to recover native fish populations. But the extent to which these remediation approaches are impacting the 'genetic health' of wild populations is lacking. To better target remediation activities, there is a need to assess the 'genetic health' of key populations of recreational species.

Deliverables

  • An assessment of the impacts of current remediation actions on the 'genetic health' of wild populations
  • A set of recommendations on when and where to apply different remediation actions to have the greatest benefit on 'genetic health'
  • Input into the review of NSW Freshwater Fish Stocking Fishery Management Strategy

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

Traditional Owners, public, MDBA, DPIE Water, DPI Fisheries managers, EWAGs, CEWO commonwealth agencies, irrigators, landholders, recreational anglers, and research partners.

Jurisdictions

NSW

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems

Other

Proposed activities should link to the following projects:

  • 2020-102 A review of fisheries enhancement methods to promote profitability and sustainability in Australian fisheries
  • 2007-057 Towards responsible native fish stocking: Identifying management concerns and appropriate research methodologies

 

Title

Enhancing NSW Pipi stocks – feasibility study

Need

  • Fishery enhancement has been proposed as a potential solution to address inter-annual variability of commercial landings of Pipis in NSW
  • Previous research has confirmed that the production of Pipi spat is possible. However, further research is required to optimise the grow out of Pipi spat to improve the likelihood of enhancement success
  • Validating these nursery techniques will also aid in assessing the economic feasibility of an industry supported fishery enhancement program

Deliverables

  • A Standard Operating Procedure for the nursery phase of Pipis
  • Cost benefit analysis that integrates validated nursey production costs
  • A Standard Operating Procedure for reseeding of Pipis maximum contribution to the wild population – including how many, what size and density of spat, assessing success
  • Review of the regulatory and biosecurity regulations for seeding hatchery produced Pipis into the wild

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

  • Pipi fishery – east coast
  • Traditional owners

Jurisdictions

NSW

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems

Other

Proposed activities should link to the following project:

  • 2009-208 Developing clam aquaculture in Australia: a feasibility study on culturing Donax deltoides and Katelysia sp on intertidal and subtidal leases in South Australia

 

Title

Integrating recreational fisher experience / satisfaction into decision making

Need

Fisher experience is regarded as an important measure of defining optimal resource use for non-commercial fishing sectors. The lack of recreational fisher experience data has been highlighted at a national level and is the subject of a current FRDC project 2018-161 National Social and Economic Survey of Recreational Fishers 2019.

Key fishing stakeholders have identified their desire to include experiential performance indicators into fisheries harvest strategies to optimise the management of available resources in the NT. This is especially important in fishery management areas where management for optimised recreational outcomes have been prioritised.

The need to apply and test existing frameworks for measuring fisher experience (or satisfaction) is necessary to validate their utility in the NT and more broadly across jurisdictions. This includes understanding the interaction between fisher satisfaction/experience and catch settings and other administrative arrangements that may influence fisher experience.

Deliverables

The proposed activity will comprise three deliverable components:

  1. To define fisher experience into measurable metrics (and should distinguish between fishery dependent and peripheral factors)
  2. To determine what data sources need to be measured
  3. To determine how the data source can be measured and applied in fisheries Policy

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

The primary end users are the recreational, tourism and Aboriginal sectors who will benefit by having tailored operational management aimed at achieving the optimal use of available resources, along with fishery managers who will have tools to better track and adjust fishery performance against stated objectives.

Jurisdictions

NT (at a minimum), but ideally involve multiple jurisdictions, particularly those across the top end (NT, QLD and WA).

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources

Other

Needs to consider findings of FRDC project 2018-161 National Social and Economic Survey of Recreational Fishers 2019.

 

Title

A synthesis of research conducted into the impacts of surface water abstraction on tropical aquatic species

Need

The Northern Territory Government is currently developing a policy on surface water abstraction with a view to utilising this resource to support the development of agriculture in the region.

A significant amount of scientific literature has identified that the impacts of water abstraction on many tropical fish species could potentially be significant. However, there is a need to synthesise this information to identify key knowledge gaps in relation to water abstraction impacts on tropical aquatic species of commercial, recreational, and traditional importance. Such a synthesis can then be used to guide future research priorities in this area.

Deliverables

  • A synthesis that will guide future research priorities into surface water abstraction impacts on tropical aquatic species
  • The synthesis will also be a reference for fishery sector representatives involved in surface water harvesting policy development

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

Research providers, fisheries management agencies, commercial, recreational and aboriginal users of the aquatic resource.

Jurisdictions

Northern Territory

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Other

 

Title

Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives into fishery management review processes, using the Northern Territory Barramundi Fishery as a case study

Need

Aboriginal people are the traditional custodians of Australia's aquatic resources and are an important stakeholder in fisheries management. However, nationally Aboriginal people have been historically underrepresented in fisheries management review processes. There is a lack of data/information on Aboriginal customary fishing and the incorporation of Aboriginal customary, cultural and economic objectives in Harvest Strategies have proven difficult.

Fishery Management Advisory Committees (MACs) are often established to advise on fishery review processes and the development of new management arrangements, including Harvest Strategies. MACs are increasingly including Aboriginal representation. However, supporting engagement is often required to record the diversity of Aboriginal perspectives into the review process and support the processes of Fishery MACs and Harvest Strategy development.

Deliverables

The project will engage with Traditional Owners to:

  • define a preferred, replicable engagement model for incorporating Aboriginal views/perspectives into NT fishery management review processes.
  • identify and refine Aboriginal specific fishery goals and appropriate monitoring approaches to inform the Barramundi Fishery review and development of a NT Barramundi fishery Harvest Strategy.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 20 DECEMBER 2021

To align the project with the delivery timeline of a review of the NT Barramundi Fishery.

End user

  • Traditional Owners of the NT coastline
  • NT Fisheries
  • NT Aboriginal Land Councils
  • NT Seafood industry

Jurisdictions

Northern Territory

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 3: A culture that is inclusive and forward thinking

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources

Outcome 5: Community trust, respect, and value

Other

The project team is expected to create linkages to the planned development of the NSW Aboriginal cultural fishing harvest strategy framework.

 

Title

Addressing uncertainties in the assessment and management of Queensland East Coast Spanish Mackerel

Need

  • Spanish Mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson) are an important species to all fishing sectors in Queensland.
  • Previous stock assessments have shown a trend of declining abundance over the last 20+ years, and there is historical evidence of spawning aggregations being extirpated off Cairns.
  • The Spanish Mackerel working group and QDAF have identified key research gaps that need to be addressed to increase the precision of future stock assessment outputs, including: generating a better understanding of catch and effort at the spawning aggregations, specifically through higher resolution spatial data, differentiating direct targeting of Spanish Mackerel vs incidental and how this affects CPUE, quantifying mortality from shark depredation and post release mortality, improving understanding of environmental influences on recruitment.

Deliverables

  • Literature review and feasibility study of suitable indices of abundance and/or recruitment for this species.
  • Quantify depredation mortality and other potential sources of fishing mortality (i.e. post release mortality).
  • Improve Spanish Mackerel catch rate standardisations using vessel tracking data and simulation approaches.
  • Measure the effect of environmental variables on Spanish Mackerel recruitment success and abundance.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

  • QDAF Fishery managers
  • GBRMPA
  • Fishers across all sectors
  • Fish processors

Jurisdictions

Queensland

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems

Other

 

Title

Commercial and recreational crab fishery – bycatch reduction strategies and escape vents

Need

With the introduction of mandatory escape vents in the commercial mud crab fishery, there are some opportunities to refine their specifications for better commercial and ecological outcomes on a regional basis.

Applicants should demonstrate consultation with commercial crab fishers.

Deliverables

  • Improvement in specifications for bycatch reduction devices in crab pots.
  • Options for adoption in recreational fishery.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

The Harvest Strategy is currently in its first year. To be effective, a shorter term (1 – 1.5 years) project would be appropriate, given the management cycle.

End user

Commercial and recreational crab fishers. Management.

Jurisdictions

Queensland – appropriate for NSW and NT consideration

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity.

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems.

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources.

Outcome 5: Community trust, respect, and value.

Other

It is expected that any application would draw on existing technologies such as those developed in the Northern Territory and adapt based on the requirements, such as size of crab, in the Queensland fisheries.

 

Title

Bioeconomic analysis of Queensland's trawl fishery to inform fishery based MEY estimates on a regional basis

Need

Queensland's Sustainable Fisheries Strategy objective is to achieve maximum economic yield (MEY), or where there is no MEY – 60% unfished biomass. In some fisheries a target of 60% unfished biomass may overestimate the level required to reach a true MEY target, while in others (such as high-cost operations – e.g. live Coral Trout, lobster) it may be too low.

Using the Queensland east coast otter trawl fisheries as an example and utilising the BDO economic information available for the fishery, undertake a comprehensive bioeconomic analysis to establish a real MEY value. This will combine biological and known economic models to inform the optimal level of fishing to maximise the economic yield for the industry.

This will also inform the data needs required to inform MEY estimation for other fisheries and be used as a pilot to improve industries understanding of how achieving MEY in fisheries can maximise their economic value and encourage higher uptake in economic data submission and confidence.

Deliverables

  • A bioeconomic model for the Trawl Fishery to inform MEY objectives under the Sustainable Fisheries Strategy and harvest strategy.
  • Identify the data needs to effectively integrate and routinely monitor MEY under the harvest strategy. Exploring the potential for low-cost proxy indicators.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

Outputs are required to inform the review of the harvest strategy in early 2025.

End user

  • Commercial fishers
  • QDAF Management
  • Commonwealth (DAWE and GBRMPA)

Jurisdictions

Queensland

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity.

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems.

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources.

Outcome 5: Community trust, respect, and value.

Other

Identified in the Trawl Fishery Harvest Strategy as a high priority

 

Title

Developing stock assessment approaches, harvest strategies and biosecurity for seaweeds in southern Australia

Need

  • Seaweed aquaculture is a rapid growth area in several jurisdictions. Because it is a new aquaculture industry there are many knowledge gaps that impede policy, regulation, and management.
  • Australia has no commercial-scale cultivation of marine macroalgae.
  • Southern Australia has diverse marine flora with more than 1,150 species and ~70% endemism. These seaweeds have potential for production for food, bioactives, nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, medicines, stock feeds and bioremediation.
  • This creates an opportunity to fill the domestic demand and cultivate native macroalgae in our pristine environment for export.
  • Industry development will rely initially on wild harvest of brood/seedstock, but there is no system to evaluate access to the standing crop or set appropriate limits and harvest strategies.
    • Theme 1. Stock assessment aims to develop a stock assessment technique and sustainable harvest strategies to provide tools for regulatory authorities and policy makers.
       
  • The national Seaweed Blueprint identified the lack of information on seaweed disease and pests to inform policy, management, and good practice to reduce biosecurity risks with translocation of seedstock and broodstock for aquaculture purposes.
    • Theme 2. Biosecurity aims to identify disease and pest risks to macroalgae and management measures for regulatory authorities and policy makers.

Deliverables

This project will be the first of its kind in Australia and will enable policy makers with scientific tools for resource management and protection

Theme 1. Stock assessment

  • Review of global literature on stock assessment survey techniques and sustainable harvest strategies and monitoring programs.
  • Identification of focus taxa based on stakeholder consultation.
  • Comparison of techniques for stock assessment surveys such as towed camera surveys, automated towed camera surveys with artificial intelligence and machine learning, and diver surveys for the prioritised taxa based on algal populations.
  • Comparison of harvest strategies and monitoring programs such as differential cropping, complete harvest and strategies adopted internationally, validated with photoquadrat surveys for the prioritised taxa based on algal populations.
  • Recommendation of a stock assessment survey technique and a harvest strategy validated with a benchmarked technique.

Theme 2. Biosecurity

  • Literature review of macroalgae diseases, pests, and health management strategies.
  • Methods to define health management units for prioritised taxa.
  • Identify necessary skills and enable a network of collaboration between the macroalgae sector, animal/plant health officers, diagnostic laboratories to improve diagnostics of macroalgae diseases.
  • A survey of diseases to provide voucher material and support trade and translocation and development of health surveillance programs
  • Development a translocation framework, biosecurity guidelines and an emergency response template.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

  • Australian seaweed industry
  • Government regulators

Jurisdictions

South Australia and other jurisdictions

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practice & production systems

Other

 

Title

Developing stock assessment approaches to determine status and set quota for Australian squid fisheries

Need

  • Several species of squid are retained by commercial and recreational fisheries across Southern Australia and are key species in several multispecies fisheries.
  • Squid species are notoriously difficult to assess due to their biology and life history. Their short life spans, aseasonal reproduction and lack of age structures prevent standard stock assessment techniques from being applied.
  • In South Australia, Southern Calamari are now the most profitable species in the South Australian Marine Scalefish Fishery (MSF) due to high market prices and low costs of fishing relative to other primary finfish species. Due to their importance to the MSF, Southern Calamari in Spencer Gulf and Gulf St Vincent are now managed with an Individual Transfer Quota (ITQ) system.
  • There is concern and anecdotes from fishers that South Australian Calamari stocks are in decline, but current assessment methods are not able to determine this. Currently, the Tasmanian stock is classified as 'Depleting' (SAFS 2020) suggesting that squid stocks are not as tolerant to the high levels of fishing previously thought.
  • Methods to assess squid population status now need to be developed, to address sustainability concerns of specific stocks and provide TACC setting advice in South Australia.
  • Develop stock assessment methods for Australian squid species and use South Australian Calamari to test their application. This would inform stock status and information for TACC setting. Opportunities for extension of these assessment methods would be their application for similar Calamari fisheries in other jurisdictions (Victoria, NSW, and Tasmania) to inform stock statuses and state-level management.

Deliverables

  • Review of global cephalopod assessments to identify best practices that could be applied to Australian squid fisheries.
  • Review, and evaluate for stock assessment purposes, data on Southern Calamari such as bycatch data that could be incorporated into an assessment.
  • Identify if a quantitative stock assessment program can be undertaken using the data available or if new methods, such as research surveys, need to be developed to support ongoing assessments.
  • Develop innovative fisheries modelling methods to assess dynamic squid stocks and incorporate potential disparate data sources.

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

  • Fisheries scientists and managers of Australian squid fisheries
  • Australian squid fishing industry

Jurisdictions

South Australia

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems

Other

 

Title

Profile of recreational fishers in Tasmania: understanding experiences, behaviours, drivers, communication needs and change factors

Need

This project addresses the need to understand current drivers and emerging trends in behaviours of recreational fishers, inclusive of fishing behaviours as well as visitation, consumption, expenditure, and communication behaviours – all of which determine the benefits and impacts of recreational fishing in Tasmania. These behaviours and their drivers will differ across different segments of recreational fishers in Tasmania (e.g., across different activity groups, such as 'inshore fishers', 'lobster fishers', 'offshore fishers'; or across avid and occasional fishers).

Having this knowledge of current behaviours and capacity to model behaviours under changing conditions or management settings of specific segments of the recreational fishing community will help in selecting effective interventions for sustainable fisheries management, and effective ways to work with recreational fishing communities to address collective challenges and improve outcomes for recreational fishers.

Understanding recreational fisher segments (profiling) will also enable the sector to actively market to and develop specific parts of the fishery to ensure a long-term approach to sustaining and potentially developing the sector. This would be of particular benefit to fishing and boating retailers, charter boat operators as well as other supporting tourism operators and other ancillary businesses to the sector.

This project will involve reviewing available data on fisher preferences and behaviour, including observations of fisher responses to changed availability of recreational opportunities. It will then involve expanding the existing general fishery survey sample frame to undertake broad-base surveys of fishing behaviours (including substitution), preferences, travel patterns, general recreational activities, and other social and psychological indicators to profile the different segments of the recreational fishing community. Question design will be informed by the review of existing work, including findings of the National Social and Economic Survey of Recreational Fishers (FRDC project 2018-161).

Profiling will also apply standard segmentation methods used in established frameworks in marketing research (e.g. MOSIAC, helix persona). This will support designing effective social marketing approaches (e.g. nudges) and communication strategies to support sustainable fisheries management.

Deliverables

  • Profile of recreational fishing by segments based on activities, and who participates in these (e.g. for activity groups, such as 'inshore fishing', 'lobster fishing', 'offshore fishing'; what are their characteristics such as participation, expenditure, avidity, motivations, preferences and aspirations, lifestyle factors, and social-demographic group?)
  • Map of the interactions/overlaps between different recreational fishing segments (fishers, activities, regions, species) and available opportunities for growth or substitution
  • Decision support tools to help understand how effective possible interventions might be at improving outcomes for fisheries/activity groups (e.g. changing behaviours, changing certain input controls), and what are the costs and benefits to which types of fishers
  • Communication platforms and practices are targeted key fisheries/activity groups and thereby support change management when required

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

End user

  • Fisheries managers
  • Recreational fishing sector

Jurisdictions

Tasmania – although potential benefits of method design to other jurisdictions

R&D Plan Outcome

Outcome 3: A culture that is inclusive and forward thinking

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources

Outcome 5: Community trust, respect, and value

Other

 

Title

Risk profile for paralytic shellfish toxins in Tasmanian Periwinkles

Need

  • It is currently unknown if Periwinkles can accumulate paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) from Tasmanian microalgal blooms (Alexandrium or Gymnodinium) and a conservative management approach has been taken thus far to protect both public health and market access.
  • Currently there is no clearly defined biotoxin management plan for Periwinkles. As grazers, Periwinkles are loosely grouped with urchins and abalone, the latter of which are a proven PST risk.
  • It is unknown whether the risk of PST accumulation by Periwinkles justifies the cost of currently recommended Periwinkle PST sampling.
  • The standard serving size for Periwinkles for the Australian domestic market, which is a key requirement for risk assessment purposes, is currently unknown – e.g. is the bivalve PST regulatory limit (based on a shellfish serving size of 100-400 g) appropriate to use in Periwinkle risk management?
  • A risk profile for PST in Periwinkles is required to inform future actions (if any) and options for cost-effective food safety management programmes

Deliverables

A risk profile for paralytic shellfish toxin in Tasmanian Periwinkles, including:

  • An estimate of the domestic serving size for Periwinkles.
  • Field sampling and toxin analysis during times of high exposure (peak and senescent phase of bloom); timing informed by bivalve monitoring programs.
  • Sampling at different spatial resolutions to inform future monitoring regimes (if required)
  • Evaluation of risk – this section will collate critical scientific information about the risk of human health illness from PST in Tasmanian Periwinkles. The evaluation will be a qualitative assessment only, given the fledgling nature of the industry and the significant knowledge gaps

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 February 2022

The project would need to start prior to July 2022 (next bloom season)

End user

  • TAS Department of Health
  • DPIPWE Marine Resources
  • DPIPWE Biosecurity (Food Safety)
  • Tasmanian commercial dive fishery

Jurisdictions

Tasmania

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 1: Growth for enduring prosperity

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems

Outcome 5: Community trust, respect, and value

Other

 

Title

Minor use permit for oxytetracycline in marine and freshwater crustaceans

Need

Oxytetracycline is broadly effective against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Globally, oxytetracycline is widely used in crustacean aquaculture. There are no permitted or registered veterinary chemical products for treating bacterial infections in marine or freshwater crustacean aquaculture.

A minor use permit (MUP) for oxytetracycline in Australian crustacean aquaculture would help decrease crustacean morbidity and mortality and improve crustacean welfare and aquaculture production, providing benefit to marine and freshwater crustacean aquaculture industries in Australia.

Deliverable

Finalise data package and submit a MUP application to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) for the use of oxytetracycline products (containing 926 grams per kilogram, g/kg oxytetracycline) to treat susceptible bacterial infections in marine and freshwater crustaceans.

Pre-Application Assistance (PAA) written advice for this project has been obtained from the APVMA. In summary, the APVMA have advised that the following data modules are required (apvma.gov.au/node/49261):

  • Workplace health and safety detailed description of feed handling and preparation (module 6.3
  • Detailed description of published residues information (module 5.5)
  • Environmental ecotoxicity study following VICH GL38 Environmental impact assessments for veterinary medicinal products Phase II (module 7.2)
  • Detailed description of efficacy in Australian environments, in Australian crustaceans and Australian bacterial strains (Vibrio spp. and Aeromonas spp.) (module 10.2)
  • Target animal safety trial following VICH GL43 Target animal safety for pharmaceuticals (module 10.2)

Please refer to PAA written advice provided

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 January 2022

End user

  • Crustacean aquaculture industries
  • Aquatic veterinarians
  • Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority

Jurisdictions

All jurisdictions

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems.

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources.

This project also aligns with Objective 6 of Draft AQUAPLAN 2021-2026: Veterinary medicines. Improved access to veterinary medicines, chemicals and vaccines strengthens management of aquatic animal health and welfare and supports prudent use of antimicrobials and therapeutics.

Other

The "Project Budget" provided must be completed and submitted with the application.

More information regarding specific Quality, Safety and Efficacy VICH guidelines can be found here: Analytical validation (vichsec.org)

This project is linked to FRDC project "2020-094: Improving the availability of safe and effective veterinary medicines for Australia's seafood industry" (https://frdc.com.au/project/2020-094).

 

Title

Minor use permit for toltrazuril in marine and freshwater finfish

Need

In Australia, there are no permitted or registered veterinary chemical products to treat internal parasite protozoan infections (e.g., scuticociliates) in marine or freshwater finfish aquaculture.

Toltrazuril products have been shown to be effective in treating some protozoan parasite infections in finfish aquaculture (Mehlhorn et al., 1988, Jaafar and Buchmann, 2011; Carraschi et al., 2014). In Australia, the use of toltrazuril containing products is currently regulated off-label by State Governments.

A minor use permit (MUP) for products containing toltrazuril would provide treatment options to aquatic veterinarians. Access to this parasite treatment option would help decrease finfish morbidity and mortality and improve finfish welfare and aquaculture production.

This project would work to develop a MUP accessible to, and provide benefit to, marine and freshwater finfish aquaculture industries in Australia.

References:

  • Carraschi, S.P., Barbuio, R., Ikefuti, C.V., Florêncio, T., da Cruz, C. and Ranzani-Paiva, M.J.T., 2014. Effectiveness of therapeutic agents in disease treatment in Piaractus mesopotamicus. Aquaculture, 431, 124-128.
     
  • Mehlhorn, H., Schmahl, G. and Haberkorn, A., 1988. Toltrazuril effective against a broad spectrum of protozoan parasites. Parasitology Research, 75(1), 64-66.
     
  • Jaafar, R.M. and Buchmann, K., 2011. Toltrazuril (Baycox® vet.) in feed can reduce Ichthyophthirius multifiliis invasion of rainbow trout (Salmonidae). Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria, 41(1), 63.

Deliverable

Finalise data package and submit a MUP application to the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) for the use of toltrazuril products (containing 50 grams per litre, g/L toltrazuril) to treat susceptible parasites including internal protozoan parasites in marine and freshwater finfish.

Pre-Application Assistance (PAA) written advice for this project has been obtained from the APVMA . In summary, the APVMA have advised that the following data modules are required (apvma.gov.au/node/49261):

  • Workplace health and safety detailed description (module 6.3)
  • Metabolism trial following VICH GL46 Quantity and nature of residues, and metabolism trial following VICH GL48 Marker residue depletion (module 5.3)
  • Environmental ecotoxicity study following VICH GL38 Environmental impact assessments for veterinary medicinal products Phase II (module 7.2) trials including degradation in aquatic systems, ecotoxicity to freshwater and marine species and an environmental release assessment
  • Efficacy study following VICH GL7 and target animal safety study following VICH GL43 guidelines (module 8.3)

Please refer to PAA written advice provided

Timing

APPLICATIONS CLOSE 14 January 2022

End user

  • Marine and freshwater finfish aquaculture industries
  • Aquatic veterinarians in Australia
  • Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority

Jurisdictions

All jurisdictions

FRDC Outcome(s)

Outcome 2: Best practices and production systems.

Outcome 4: Fair and secure access to aquatic resources.

This project also aligns with Objective 6 of Draft AQUAPLAN 2021-2026: Veterinary medicines. Improved access to veterinary medicines, chemicals and vaccines strengthens management of aquatic animal health and welfare and supports prudent use of antimicrobials and therapeutics.

Other

The "Project Budget" provided must be completed and submitted with the application.

More information regarding specific Quality, Safety and Efficacy VICH guidelines can be found here: Analytical validation (vichsec.org)

This project is linked to FRDC project "2020-094: Improving the availability of safe and effective veterinary medicines for Australia's seafood industry" (https://frdc.com.au/project/2020-094).