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Title:

Where did the Snapper go? Determining factors influencing the recovery of Snapper stocks on the west coast of Australia

Project Number:

2018-050

Organisation:

Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) WA

Principal Investigator:

Gary Jackson

Project Status:

Current

FRDC Expenditure:

$352,587.00

Program(s):

Adoption, Environment

Need

Ensuring that connectivity and stock dynamics are well understood is crucial to determining the appropriate scale for fisheries management and assessment. There is strong industry and management interest in determining the extent to which connectivity and stock dynamics of snapper along the west coast might have changed over time reflecting changes in environmental conditions and stock abundance. There is a need to reassess the most appropriate scale for management of the snapper resource in WA under the new Aquatic Resources and Management Act. There is a need to evaluate whether active-acoustic methods can improve capacity to monitor the spatial distribution and abundance of snapper in key spawning aggregations and whether these methods are complementary to the existing approaches used to assess snapper stocks in the GCB and WCB and elsewhere in Australia.

Objectives

1. Improve understanding of snapper stock connectivity between the Gascoyne and West Coast Bioregions using high-resolution genomic techniques

2. Identify evidence of key sources of recruitment to snapper stocks in the Gascoyne and West Coast Bioregions using otolith microchemistry

3. Quantify snapper egg and larval dispersal between the Gascoyne and West Coast Bioregions using high-resolution ocean circulation modelling

4. Evaluate the use of active acoustic methods for monitoring the distribution and abundance of snapper in spawning aggregations

5. Investigate possible changes in key biological parameters in snapper in the Gascoyne and West Coast Bioregions in relation to changes in environmental conditions and stock abundance