Project number: 2009-322
Project Status:
Completed
Budget expenditure: $209,339.00
Principal Investigator: Neil Stump
Organisation: Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council (TSIC)
Project start/end date: 31 Mar 2010 - 27 Aug 2012
Contact:
FRDC

Need

The major need this project will aim to address is to build and enhance seafood industry representational capacity at the local and regional level. To achieve this, the project will meet the following specific needs for:

• novel ways to address barriers to the uptake of representative roles
• an entry through to intermediate-level training program which is a precursor to leadership training, and therefore contributes to a structured leadership training pathway
• training opportunities to upskill industry and non-industry representatives in areas of fisheries management principles, governance and decision-making processes, and basic representational skills, which use effective training delivery mechanisms and are supported by viable funding models

The needs this project targets are drawn directly from needs articulated in the background section of this proposal and in the following two reports.

Firstly, the FRDC’s People Development Program Plan 2008-2013has identified that there is “an urgent need to develop people within all sectors who have the skills to effectively contribute to debate and policy development for significant challenges confronting industry”. One of the objectives of the Program is therefore to “build industry capacity to drive change to achieve goals”.

To achieve this objective, the Program has recognized the following needs:
• strengthen governance and representational capabilities of industry organisations
• increase the capacity of industry organisations to represent the views of members
• enhance industry’s ability to contribute to debate and policy development
• build industry committee member competence and confidence

Secondly, the FRDC TRF Final Report ‘Understanding the Drivers of Fisher Engagement in Industry Bodies’ (Project 2009/335) has identified the need for the following:
• governance training program for fishing industry associations;
• industry associations to focus on representation as their major role;
• leadership training to be developed for teams of industry, and to be strategically funded.

Objectives

1. Identification of key knowledge areas and skill sets needed by fisheries resource users (commercial, recreational and indigenous fishers and marine farmers) and managers taking up representative roles at the local and regional level
2. Identification of novel ways to address barriers to the uptake of representative roles at the local and regional level for each sector, including effective training delivery models, viable funding models and other support mechanisms
3. Production of a comprehensive multi-level training tool-kit for the development of representational capacity at the local and regional level which is non-proprietarial
4. Provide the first steps of a structured leadership training pathway by conducting eight pilot training programs in four locations for over eighty members of the Australian seafood industry

Final report

ISBN: 9780646595641
Author: Julian J Harrington Neil E Stump
Final Report • 2013-04-02 • 449.85 KB
2009-322-DLD.pdf

Summary

This project has developed a comprehensive training package that builds representational capacity at the foundational level of the Australian seafood industry. 

The “Charting Your Own Course” training package incorporates four key training resources: 

  • Resource 1: Participant Workbook
  • Resource 2: Facilitator Guide
  • Resource 3: Self‐Paced Learning Manual
  • Resource 4: Advisory Committee Member Guide

These resources can be downloaded from the sections below.

This multi‐tooled training package approach will allow seafood industry associations and advisory groups to select the content and delivery style suited to their members’ needs. 

The concept of self‐paced learning has been included in the “Charting Your Own Course” training package. This training delivery method falls outside the seafood industry norm of workshops. Although workshops still hold a valuable place in seafood industry training, this project found that engagement with workshops by members of the seafood industry with no or minimal representational experience (the target audience) was poor. Self‐paced learning provides a delivery model that maximises flexibility in both the timing, cost and delivery of course content, which in turn should improve engagement with the training package content. 

Final Report • 2013-04-02 • 1.80 MB
2009-322 Workbook.pdf

Summary

This workbook is one of a series of resources designed to support the development of skills and knowledge in industry representation for members of the fisheries and aquaculture industry.

It aims to build representational capacity at the local and regional level and provide useful skills in understanding and representing industry as well as personal awareness.

Final Report • 2013-04-02 • 3.24 MB
2009-322 Facilitators Manual.pdf

Summary

This guide contains resources for experienced and active seafood industry members to assist in facilitating these modules with emerging industry representatives in a workshop environment.

In this guide you will find:

  • Facilitator notes and activities
  • Sample agendas
  • Presentation slides
  • Template resources
Final Report • 2013-04-02 • 2.14 MB
2009-322 Self Paced Learning Manual.pdf

Summary

This workbook is one of a series of resources designed to support the development of skills and knowledge in industry representation for members of the fisheries and aquaculture industry.

It is focused on supporting individual self-paced learning.

Final Report • 2013-04-02 • 1.39 MB
2009-322 Advisory Guide.pdf

Summary

This guide has been developed to provide an introduction to the key issues and topics relevant to advisory committee membership. The aim of the guide is to provide both new and existing committee members with the knowledge and tools needed to be an effective member.

The guide allows users to find out about being an advisory member at their own pace, and in their working or home environment. New advisory committee members are encouraged to read the guide prior to participating in advisory committee processes. The guide can also be used as a reference for committee members to refresh their understanding of advisory committee processes.

Final Report • 2013-04-02 • 7.92 MB
2009-322 AMC Final Report.pdf

Summary

This study is a part of this larger project and the main aim of the study is the identification of key knowledge areas and skill sets needed by fisheries resource users (commercial, recreational and marine farmers) and managers taking up representative roles at the local and regional level.

The main advantage to be gained from this study is the development of training programs that meet the needs of seafood industry representatives to fulfil their roles as effectively as possible.

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