Project number: 2014-032
Project Status:
Completed
Budget expenditure: $600,000.00
Principal Investigator: Gustaaf Hallegraeff
Organisation: University of Tasmania (UTAS)
Project start/end date: 31 Jul 2014 - 31 Dec 2017
Contact:
FRDC

Need

The 2012 Tasmanian biotoxin event represents a paradigm shift for seafood risk management in Tasmania and Australia as a whole. The causative dinoflagellates are extremely difficult to identify by routine plankton monitoring, and are toxic at very low cell concentrations (50-100 cells/L) . Sampling the extensive Tasmanian coast line poses a major logistical challenge, with early hints that the blooms originate offshore. The precise pathway of toxin transfer to rock lobster is unclear. The presence of cyst beds suggest that problems will persist .

Objectives

1. Develop, test and calibrate screening techniques for rapid detection and evaluation of toxins
2. Elucidate genetic population structure and biology (inshore or offshore origin) of toxic Alexandrium tamarense- group algae using state-of-the art molecular and biotoxin screening techniques
3. Integrate existing Tasmanian east coast oceanographic modeling with field bloom biology data to enable seasonal and spatial (risk zone) prediction during biotoxin event development.
4. Establish the relative risk of Tasmanian seafood species to accumulate marine biotoxins to underpin a state-wide approach to biotoxin risk management.

Final report

ISBN: 978-1-925646-08-5
Authors: Gustaaf Hallegraeff Chris Bolch Katrina Campbell Scott Condie Juan Dorantes-Aranda Shauna Murray Alison Turnbull Sarah Ugalde
Final Report • 2018-02-28 • 18.01 MB
2014-032-DLD.pdf

Summary

The 2012 Tasmanian biotoxin event represents a paradigm shift for seafood risk management in Tasmania and Australia as a whole. The causative dinoflagellates are extremely difficult to identify by routine plankton monitoring, and are toxic at very low cell concentrations (50-100 cells/L). Sampling the extensive Tasmanian coast line poses a major logistical challenge. This project sought to improve the understanding of Tasmanian harmful algal bloom biology, ecology and toxicology to support seafood biotoxin risk management.

Related research

Industry
Environment
Industry
PROJECT NUMBER • 2018-090
PROJECT STATUS:
COMPLETED

Improving early detection surveillance and emergency disease response to Pacific Oyster Mortality Syndrome (POMS) using a hydrodynamic model for dispersion of OsHV-1

1. To model viral particle dispersal at key locations around the State, including commercial oyster growing areas, known feral oyster populations and ports, and incorporating seasonal oceanographic parameters
ORGANISATION:
Department of Primary Industries and Regions South Australia (PIRSA)