Maintenance of adequate levels of dissolved oxygen (DO) are critical for the health and production of aquaculture species
Budget expenditure: $17,960.00
Project Status:
Completed
Principal Investigator: Dean Jerry
Organisation: James Cook University (JCU)
Project start/end date: 28 Jan 2018 - 30 Jun 2018
Contact:
FRDC
TAGS
Efficiency
Biology
Automation
Aquaculture
SPECIES
Barramundi

Need

Aquaculture is conducted largely on experience often driven by “gut-feel” in response to biological demands and environmental constraints of production systems. Aquaculture is often described as a “black-box”, as data and analytics to make informed decisions are often absent, not routinely collected or in a form that is readily analysed.

Due to a low appetite for risk and inaccurate or sparse environmental data, overcompensation of energy and nutritional resources often occur, raising the cost of production. The implementation of real-time monitoring and sensor network systems can drive increased efficiencies, boost yields, minimise waste and help aquaculture ecosystems fulfil their potential. Similarly, the novel application of existing energy saving technologies to the aquaculture sector may provide early opportunities for reduced production costs and improved animal growth and survival.

The Australian Barramundi farming industry needs to increase efficiency to reduce costs to assist when competing against low cost imported fish coming into the market. Automation is one of the disruptive technologies the ABFA will be looking into.

This project concept was identified as a priority area of R&D by the ABFA at its latest R&D Meeting (Darwin 2017).

Objectives

1. To confirm whether automated aerataion control and real-time water quality measurements is suitable to the Australian Barramundi industries requirements
2. Provide metrics to assess the impacts that automated aeration has on power and labour costs and fish growth.

Related research

Industry
Industry
Industry