Project number: 2004-096
Project Status:
Completed
Budget expenditure: $106,667.00
Principal Investigator: Neil Stump
Organisation: Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council (TSIC)
Project start/end date: 28 Feb 2004 - 31 Oct 2006
Contact:
FRDC

Need

The overarching need is for demonstrable environmentally sustainable resource use in the Tasmanian aquaculture industry. On a local/regional level, there is an identified need for an EMS officer to facilitate development of EM systems for specific aquaculture industries in Tasmania. Evolution of EM systems throughout the industry will be fragmented unless an organised process of introduction and development is provided. National and state ESD and NRM strategic initiatives (along with legislative requirements) need to be incorporated into any industry EMS project development.

A partnership between regulators, industry and the peak representative body (TFIC) is being formed to develop and implement EMS within the Tasmanian aquaculture industry. Finfish growers are part of this new partnership, demonstrating a desire to address environmental responsibility. While the largest salmon producer in the state has taken some steps towards EMS accreditation, as yet other stakeholders in this sector are yet to establish EM systems.

Poor community perceptions of the oyster growing industry are typified by regular protests about the proliferation of feral oysters. The development of an EMS template that addresses problems such as this will allow oyster growers to demonstrate that they are being proactive in dealing with industry impacts on the environment.

With pilot projects based on the Green Chooser template underway by Tasmanian East Coast shellfish farmers, the appointment of an EMS officer to the Tasmanian aquaculture industry will enable a more collaborative and uniform rollout of EM systems. Under the guidance of an EMS officer each individual program will feed into other similar programs, strengthening the value of individual EM systems and the entire industry initiative.

The employment of an EMS officer for the aquaculture industry will be instrumental in capitalising on previous FRDC/industry investments. It fits neatly with the Seafood Industry Training Package Review recommendations to elevate environmental awareness/management and ESD within the training modules.

Objectives

1. The overall goal is demonstrable and credible environmentally sustainable use of natural resources where industry does not live off the environmental capital but from the return gained from using that resource, incorporating intergenerational responsibility into the process.
2. The key objective for this project is to develop and produce an EMS template document as a tool for each of the salmonid, oyster and abalone sectors of the Tasmanian aquaculture industry for use as a generic framework that is the backbone of local and regional individualised EM systems.
3. The intent is for an appointed EMS officer (in conjunction with industry representatives) to produce these three key EMS templates based on the Green Chooser model. These documents will embody stated national, state and local ESD/NRM goals in conjunction with all relevant legislative requirements.

Final report

Author: Neil Stump
Final Report • 2009-05-08
2004-096-DLD.pdf

Summary

The aquaculture industry has become increasingly aware of the need to clearly demonstrate that they are adopting “best practice” in their operations to ensure there are minimal deleterious impacts on the marine environment from marine farming activities. At a national level the development of The National ESD Framework “How To” Guide for Aquaculture Version 1.1
(Fletcher et al. 2004) has provided a basis for industry, government and researchers to identify and develop mitigation strategies to ensure long term sustainability.

The Tasmanian EMS Framework is an industry initiative that has been developed by the abalone, oyster and salmonid sectors with input and support from the Tasmanian Department of Environment and Water (DPIW), the Tasmanian Aquaculture and Fisheries Institute (TAFI), the Tasmanian Aquaculture Council (TAC) and the Tasmanian Fishing Industry Council (TFIC). 

The EMS developed for each sector has been embedded in the ESD compliance framework. Using a risk assessment approach the environmental, social and economic impacts of the industry were critically evaluated. The risk assessments were determined by taking into consideration current management controls, valid scientific data and regulatory requirements. The risk assessments were undertaken by a working group from the relevant sector with appropriate expertise. However the final risk ratings assigned were not necessarily a complete consensus view of all members of the working group.

For the oyster and abalone sectors the majority of the industry’s operational practices were found to pose a low risk to the marine environment outside the lease area. The one environmental high risk area of concern identified for the oyster industry is the potential translocation of invasive marine species between regions. The risk assessment also found that there maybe some impacts on sensitive habitats such as salt marsh at a regional level.

External environmental impacts were found to provide the majority of moderate, high and extreme risks to all industry sectors.

The risk to the industry sustainability from an economic perspective was assessed as being moderate, it is recommended that the risk could be mitigated by strategic business planning, the continued adherence to sustainable farming practices and by developing risk management strategies to reduce the economic risk.

The risk of the industry having a negative social impact at a state, regional and local level was assessed as being low. The potential negative impact on industry sustainability by increasing regulation across all tiers of government was considered to be moderate.

Final Report • 2009-05-08 • 6.52 MB
2004-096- Appendix 5- EMS Framework Tasmanian Oyster Industry.pdf

Summary

The Environmental Management System (EMS) Framework for the Tasmanian oyster Industry was developed after consideration of the environmental, social and economic impacts of the industry. This process has enabled the identification and documentation of critical issues that will assist the Industry, researchers and regulators to pursue and develop mitigation strategies to achieve long term sustainability.

The Tasmanian EMS Framework is an Industry initiative embraced by the Tasmanian Oyster Research Council (TORC), the Tasmanian Shellfish Executive Council (TSEC), the Tasmanian Marine Farmers Association (TMFA) and the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW), supported by the Tasmanian Fishing Industry Council (TFIC) and the Tasmanian Aquaculture Council (TAC) and co-funded by the Federal government through the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC).  Similar documents are being produced through the Tasmanian Abalone Growers Association (TAGA) and the Tasmanian Salmonid Growers Association (TSGA).

This document has been modelled on The National ESD Framework “How To” Guide for Aquaculture Version 1.1 (Fletcher et al. 2004).  The marine farming industry is committed to incorporating ESD into their management processes and the principles of sustainable development is enshrined in all to Tasmania’s natural resource management legislation. A direct outcome of this commitment has been the development of the ESD framework for aquaculture that was generated by a FRDC subprogram in conjunction with the Aquaculture Committee of the Australian Fisheries Managers Forum (AFMF) working in association with the National Aquaculture Council (NAC).

Final Report • 2009-05-08 • 25.58 MB
2004-096- Appendix 6- EMS Framework Tasmanian Farmed Abalone Industry.pdf

Summary

The Environmental Management System (EMS) Framework for the Tasmanian farmed abalone Industry is a document developed after consideration of the environmental, social and economic impacts of the Industry in terms of sustainable development.  This process has enabled the identification within the document of critical issues which will enable Industry, researchers and regulators to pursue and develop mitigation strategies that will ensure the long term sustainability of the Tasmanian farmed abalone industry.

The EMS Framework is an Industry initiative embraced by the Tasmanian Abalone Growers Association (TAGA) and the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW), supported by the Tasmanian Fishing Industry Council (TFIC) and the Tasmanian Aquaculture Council (TAC) and co-funded by the Federal government through the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC).  Similar documents are being produced through the Tasmanian Oyster Research Council (TORC) and the Tasmanian Salmonid Growers Association (TSGA).

This document has been modelled on The National ESD Framework “How To” Guide for Aquaculture Version 1.1 (Fletcher et al. 2004).  The marine farming industry is committed to incorporating ESD into their management processes and the principles of sustainable development is enshrined in all to Tasmania’s natural resource management legislation. A direct outcome of this commitment has been the development of the ESD framework for aquaculture that was generated by a FRDC subprogram in conjunction with the Aquaculture Committee of the Australian Fisheries Managers Forum (AFMF) working in association with the National Aquaculture Council (NAC).

Final Report • 2009-05-08 • 9.85 MB
2004-096- Appendix 7- EMS Framework Tasmanian Salmonid Industry.pdf

Summary

The Environmental Management System (EMS) Framework for the Tasmanian Salmonid Industry is a document developed after consideration of the environmental, social and economic impacts of the Industry in terms of sustainability. This process has enabled the identification and documentation of critical issues that will assist the industry, researchers and regulators to pursue and develop mitigation strategies to ensure long-term sustainability.

The Tasmanian EMS Framework is an Industry initiative embraced by the Tasmanian Salmonid Growers Association (TSGA) and the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries and Water (DPIW), supported by the Tasmanian Fishing Industry Council (TFIC) and the Tasmanian Aquaculture Council (TAC) and co-funded by the Federal government through the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC). Similar documents are being produced through the Tasmanian Abalone Growers Association (TAGA) and the Tasmanian Oyster Research Council (TORC).

This document has been modelled on The National ESD Framework “How To” Guide for Aquaculture Version 1.1 (Fletcher et al. 2004).  The marine farming industry is committed to incorporating ESD into their management processes and the principles of sustainable development is enshrined in all to Tasmania’s natural resource management legislation. A direct outcome of this commitment has been the development of the ESD framework for aquaculture that was generated by a FRDC subprogram in conjunction with the Aquaculture Committee of the Australian Fisheries Managers Forum (AFMF) working in association with the National Aquaculture Council (NAC).

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