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Title:

People development program: Primary industries health and safety collaborative partnership 2012-2015

Project Number:

2012-409

Organisation:

AgriFutures Australia

Project Status:

Completed

FRDC Expenditure:

$150,000.00

Program(s):

People

Need

About 150 persons die from non–intentional injury each year on Australian farms. Between 300 and 350 male farmers and farm workers die a traumatic death from all causes each year. The mortality rate in Australian farming is approximately four times that of the all-industries rated (19.5 per 100,000 employees compared to 5.5 per 100,000 employees) (Durey and Lower, 2004). The rate of workers compensation claims from agriculture, forestry and fishing in 2001-2002 was 27 per thousand employees. There are about 4,500 claims each year made by workers in the agricultural and horticultural industries. Also self employed farmers are not obliged to report injuries so that the incidence reported may be an underestimate. In the four years 1989-1992 a total of 55 people were fatally injured while involved in work related fishing industries (NOHSC, 1999). Between 1991 and 2001 a total of 16 professional fishermen drowned as a result of falling or being washed from commercial fishing vessels in Victorian waters. Available statistics indicate that there is a higher rate of suicide among rural populations generally, and farmers in particular. For example, in the period 1988 to 1997, 921 suicides were identified for farm managers and agricultural labourers (Page & Fragar, 2002). The ABS reports that between 1988 and 1998, the suicide rate was up to 17 per 100,000 persons per year in rural areas, compared to 12-13 per 100,000 in the capital cities. The health status and determinants of health (e.g. death rates, income etc) are generally worse in rural and remote areas than in metropolitan areas. There is a need to identify factors that contribute to this discrepancy, particularly as it is likely to apply to farmers and fishers. There is a prevailing opinion that many farm and fishing injuries and deaths are preventable. Lack of awareness of occupational health and safety, and a culture of safety, still fails to be effectively dealt with across all States of Australia. The OHS data identifies that the commercial fishing industry has rates of claims that are average for the overall Agriculture, Fishing and Forestry sector, but that claims for fatal injuries in aquaculture and non fatal in marine (or wild capture) fisheries are both increasing relative to employment. The most ‘at risk’ group in the industry are those between the age of 20 to 24 years, with those aged 45 – 54 years being the next most at risk group, and will receive injuries from non powered hand tools, to their upper bodies

Objectives

1. Develop supporting information and data to continue to deliver well-targeted and effective research and extension projects.

2. Change the health and safety culture to enhance farming, fishing and forestry competitiveness and the wellbeing of the families and communities involved.

3. Provide solutions through R&D for key industry health and safety risks.

People development program: Primary industries health and safety collaborative partnership 2012-2015

Final Report
ISBN:
ISSN:
Author(s):AgriFutures Australia
Date Published:

FRDC invested in the Primary industries health and safety collaborative partnership - there is no final report, however the following three (3) products were developed:

- Health and Safety in the Australian Fishing Industry - RIRDC Publication No.  11/021

- Adoption of Health and Safety Change on Australian Farming and Fishing Enterprises - RIRDC Publication No. 10/222

- RIRDC Completed Projects in 2009 - 2010 and Research in Progress as at June 2010

 

Collaborative partnership for Farming and Fishing Health and Safety

Report
ISBN:978-1-74254-068-9
ISSN:1440-6845
Author(s):AgriFutures Australia
Date Published:December 2010

The Collaborative Partnership for Farming and Fishing Health and Safety Research in Progress June 2010 contains short summaries of continuing projects as well as those that were completed during 2009-2010. This Program aims to undertake R&D and research application activities that improve the:

  • Physical health of farming and fishing workers and their families
  • Mental health of farming and fishing families
  • The safety of the work environment and practices in farming and fishing industries.

This report is an addition to RIRDC’s diverse range of over 2000 research publications which are available for viewing, free downloading or purchasing online at www.rirdc.gov.au.  Purchases can also be made by phoning 1 300 634 313.

Health and Safety in the Australian Fishing Industry

Report
ISBN:978-1-74254-208-9
ISSN:1440-6845
Author(s):Dr Kate Brooks
Date Published:March 2011

This project emanates from the identification of gaps in occupation health and safety (OHS) data for the fishing industry by the Collaborative Partnership for Farming and Fishing Health and Safety Program across all three of its objectives. The research is important as it provides a basis upon which to understand the OHS issues and challenges of the fishing industry and where further efforts and investment could most effectively be targeted.

The primary beneficiaries of this research are the commercial fishing industry, research and funding providers. The information contained in this report provides a clear guidance to the industry of its OHS circumstance relative to other primary industries (forestry and agriculture). It identifies the most ‘at risk’ groups in the industry, and the existing and emerging high risk elements of the industry. It also identifies those areas and issues that are in most need of further investment, and those which would produce the most effective outcomes in terms of reducing the incidences of OHS claims in commercial fishing.

The key finding is that a lack of awareness of occupational health and safety, and a culture of safety, still fails to be effectively dealt with across all States of Australia. The OHS data identifies that the commercial fishing industry has rates of claims that are average for the overall Agriculture, Fishing and Forestry sector, but that claims for fatal injuries in aquaculture and non fatal in marine (or wild capture) fisheries are both increasing relative to employment. The most ‘at risk’ group in the industry are those between the age of 20 to 24 years, with those aged 45 – 54 years being the next most at risk group, and will receive injuries from non powered hand tools, to their upper bodies.

The importance of this report is that on the basis of the best available statistical data (which represents in the vicinity of only 18% of the industry’s participants), it provides some fifteen suggestions and recommendations for the industry and funding agencies to consider in regard to research, communication and training in the commercial fishing industry. It is the most useful basis that has been provided in recent years for framing a coherent approach to redressing the OHS issues in the commercial fishing industry and to arrest increasing rates of OHS claims.

This project was funded by the Collaborative Partnership for Farming and Fishing Health and Safety.

This report, an addition to RIRDC’s diverse range of over 2000 research publications, forms part of our Collaborative Partnership for Farming and Fishing Health and Safety Research and Development Program, which aims to improve the physical and mental health of farming and fishing workers and their families, and the safety environment and work practices in farming and fishing industries.

Most of RIRDC’s publications are available for viewing, free downloading or purchasing online at www.rirdc.gov.au. Purchases can also be made by phoning 1300 634 313.

Adoption of Health and Safety Change on Australian Farming and Fishing Enterprises

Report
ISBN:978-1-74254-187-7
ISSN:1440-6845
Author(s):Lyn Fragar, Tony Lower and John Temperley
Date Published:March 2011
This research report extends the evidence base regarding effective interventions and adoption in relation to the farming and fishing industries. Specifically, it aligns with the objectives of the Collaborative Partnership for Farming and Fishing Safety addressing physical and mental health, along with the safety environment and work practices. The findings of this report will assist the Collaborative Partnership for Farming and Fishing Safety to undertake the necessary work that will inform a portfolio of farm and fishing health and safety programs that are underpinned by “best practice”.

Reducing rates of death and injury in the Australian fishing industry

Report
ISBN:978-1-74254-961-3
ISSN:1440-6845
Author(s):Annie Jarrett and Adrianne Laird, NPF Industry Pty Ltd
Date Published:
This report details the experience of the cognitive-based safety training provided to crews and skippers of the Northern Prawn Fishery in 2015 and 2016 as a way to increase safety on board fishing vessels through enhancing safety attitudes and behaviours.